Category Archives: Tutorials

Minimalist Photography ~ 4 Tips To Keep It Simple With A Maximum Impact

Minimalism is a very subjective concept in the art world. The Webster dictionary defines it as follows: A style or technique that is characterized by extreme spareness and simplicity. Some love it, others hate it, but no one seems to be indifferent. Many artists thrive in the openness of the concept, others have a problem with the lack of definition and direction. Many of us are drawn to ‘less is more’ with simple lines, geometric patterns, strong shadows, contrasting colors, lone subjects, etc. For others, deciding what to leave out of the frame to make a stronger image is a difficult exercise. Here are a few tips and examples to get you started in your quest for minimalist imagery.

via Minimalist Photography ~ 4 Tips To Keep It Simple With A Maximum Impact.

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How to photograph anything: best camera settings for perfect portrait photography

Any member feedback on this article? Do you agree with most of the recommended settings and techniques? Please enter your comments!

In the second part of our Shoot Like A Pro series on how to photograph any subject you want we take a closer look at the best camera settings for portrait photography. Our guide takes you through blurring backgrounds, setting up your camera for moving subjects, indoors vs outdoor portraits, and more.

via How to photograph anything: best camera settings for perfect portrait photography.


The Manual Photography Cheat Sheet – Blog About Infographics and Data Visualization – Cool Infographics

The Manual Photography Cheat Sheet - Blog About Infographics and Data Visualization - Cool Infographics

The Manual Photography Cheat Sheet by Miguel “Mig” Yatco is a very cool infographic for anyone who is ready to move off of Automatic Mode on their camera!  Yes, that means you!  Quit taking average photos with average settings!No matter if you shoot with film or digital, understanding of these four aspects of photography are key to taking good shots.  I love how each one shows the reader the range of values, the impact of moving along the range to the pictures and what the actual display looks like in the viewfinder on both Nikon and Canon cameras.

via The Manual Photography Cheat Sheet – Blog About Infographics and Data Visualization – Cool Infographics.


Using the Sun As A Compositional Element

For the most part, as photographers, we avoid shooting into the sun for fear that we’ll get some unsightly flaring.  The sun DOES present some exposure challenges, and of course, flare is a concern, but by carefully composing your shot, and properly exposing, including the sun in your images can create stunning results.

The first secret to using the sun is about positioning.  When you can, position the sun behind something else in your image. In the image of the photographer above, this gives the effect of a halo, helping create the silhouetted image.  By using exposure compensation to darken the exposure, I kept the sun from blowing out, and darkened the main subject into the silhouette. I then adjusted the white balance and color saturation to get the final result. Because the image was shot at f/2.8, the sun appeared as a giant ball in the image. In another example, the image of the daisies, a wide angle lens was used to make the sun smaller in the image, and was then positioned just behind the stem of the daisy. Because the image was shot at a smaller aperture, f/22, the sun appears as a star rather than a ball.  One of the cool things that happens when shooting into the sun with a wide angle lens at a small aperture is that the light falls off in the areas away from the sun, creating dramatic skies that go from near white by the sun, to deep blue in the corners.

via Using the Sun As A Compositional Element.


Advanced Skin Retouching Tutorial by ~PorterRetouching on deviantART


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